Veggie green chili to warm your winter

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 This post I'm breaking rules. I never buy a load of fresh green chiles in the dead of winter, but like I said, I'm breaking rules! Another rule is the Colorado Green chili cannot be vegetarian. DONE and BROKEN. I'm also shattering realities this week in my own life. I'm selling things from our home and life, we're packing all our stuff in boxes, and saying goodbye to this lovely piece of farm and woods we've called home for the past few years. So yeah, I get to break rules this week and find comfort in a hearty, warm, chile-packed bowl of white bean chili. You should break rules too. (You can also serve this the Denver way. Poured over top a burrito).

6 - poblano peppers
4 - anaheim peppers
1-2 - jalapeno peppers (depending on your desired spice level)
1 - large yellow onion (diced)
8 - garlic cloves (grated or minced)
3-4TB - olive oil
1 bunch - green onions (slivered) I use it to about half way up the green stalk.
2 cans - tomatillos (11 ounce cans of tomatillos, drained) chopped
2 cans - white beans (drained and rinsed)
4-5 cups - vegetable broth
1-2 - big handfuls of cilantro
2 - limes (juice of 2 limes and zest of 1)
3 TB - cumin
2 TB - coriander
1 TB - chile pepper
1-2 tsp - paprika
salt to taste
Sour cream, thick greek yogurt, tortilla chips, cheddar, pumpkin seeds (optional toppings)

Roast all the chiles until the skin is blistered and soft. You can either do this by roasting the peppers over the flames of your gas stove, rotating every few minutes (like pictured in the photo above). Or you can roast chiles in the oven, rubbed with a little oil, at 475 degrees for about 15-20 minutes, turning once.

Once peppers are roasted, set them aside until they are cool enough to handle. Once cool enough, peel off the charred pepper skin and discard (keep just a few pieces of charred skin to chop up with your peppers). De-seed your roasted peppers and then chop them into small pieces and set aside for later. Chop up the garlic and onions, place into a large pot with 3TB of olive oil. Let the onions cook, stirring occasionally for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, drain your cans of tomatillos and dice them up, also slice up your green onions.

Add in your cumin, coriander, chile pepper, and paprika to the onion mixture. Stir and cook for a minute. Then add in all your roasted chiles (along with the few bits of reserved charred skin) and green onions. Stir for a minute or two and then add in all your diced tomatillos and both cans of white beans. Stir gently. Then add 3-4 cups vegetable broth. If the chili seems too thick for your liking at this point, add in a little more vegetable broth. Bring the chile up to a simmer and add in the lime zest. Let it simmer for about 15 minutes and then add in the lime juice and cilantro. Add in salt, to taste, and also adjust your spices here, if desired. Serve warm, topped with a dollop of sour cream or thick greek yogurt with tortilla chips or pumpkin seeds.

Tempeh lettuce wraps with a habanero plum sauce

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We are eating colorful meals to celebrate the end of summer produce. These photos highlight some of the best-of-summer from our lives this year. We were lucky to get in a trip to Guatemala where we ate tortillas in cities of colorful plaster walls & wild looking begonia vines. Long, bumpy rides through the jungle in a pickup truck to reach a river oasis. Swimming through dark caves with no lights, holding only a candle, and jumping into pristine blue pools of Neverland. Hiking up active, smoking volcanoes and toasting marshmallows over hot pockets of lava. Ahhh. Guatemala. Enough already, just go. The people are lovely, the country is beautiful, and the food is delicious. 

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Perhaps the most famous folklore legend of Guatemala is the story if El Sombrerón. It is a story based around the idea of a boogeyman... but one that it a bit more magical and in-a-way romantic. Although I enjoy the story itself, the lesson of the tale is one that is drenched in traditionalism. Lessons for daughters that bad things happen to them when they go off with men in the night. Reguardless, El Sombrerón  is an interesting character. Below is a little information about El Sombrerón - gathered from Wiki.

This character's main characteristics are always the same: a short man with black dress a thick and brilliant belt; he wears a black, large hat and boots that make a lot of noise when he walks.

He likes to mount horses and braid their tails and manes. When he cannot find horses, he braids dogs. He also likes to court young ladies who have long hair and big eyes. When he likes one in particular, he follows her, braids her hair, serenades to her with his silver guitar; but he also puts soil in her plate and she is not able to eat or sleep.

El Sombrerón appears at dusk, dragging along a group of mules carrying coal, with whom he travels around the city and its neighborhoods. When a woman corresponds to his love, he ties the mules to the house's pole where she lives, unhooks his guitar and starts singing and dancing. Some residents from the neighborhoods of La Recolección and Parroquia Vieja say he still wanders at nights when there is a full moon.

Sauce

Garlic - 4 cloves, minced

Yellow onion - 1/2 a medium onion, diced

Ginger - 2 TB finely grated or minced, fresh

Habanero chillies (or other desirable chilles), seeds removed and sliced

Plums - I used about a generous pint, about 2 cups once cut in half & pits removed.

Water - 1/3 cup

Tamari (or other soy sauce) - 1TB (generous)

Mirin - 1TB

Honey - 1TB (generous)

Anise seeds - 5 stars

Cloves - 6-8 cloves

Fennel seeds - generous 1 tsp

Cinnamon stick - 1 stick

Olive oil or coconut oil - 2TB

Prep your garlic, ginger, onion, habaneros, and plums. Place oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat and add garlic, onions, and ginger. Let cook, stirring frequently, until everything is fragrant, soft, and translucent. Cook for about 10 minutes and then add habaneros and plums and cook for another minute or two. Add water and then the spices. I put the spices into a tea bag (or tea) ball to steep. Cover & cook until everything is soft, bubbly, and very fragrant. Another 10 minutes. Remove spices & turn off the heat. Add in the liquids of soy sauce, mirin, and honey. Stir until combine & then transfer into a blender. Blend until smooth & then set aside until later.

Wraps

Radicchio (or other lettuce) - 1 head. Honestly, I thought the radicchio was a bit too spicy for this dish and that it would work better with a sweeter cabbage or iceburg.

Tempeh - 1 package, crumbled

Shallots - 2, small, slivered

Garlic - 2 cloves, minced

Carrots - 1 carrots, minced

Sweet peppers - 1 generous cup, sliced

Water chestnuts - 1 small can, diced

Tamari (or other soy sauce) - 1 -2 TB

Peanuts - a few TB, crushed

Cilantro - 1 handful, minced

Green onions - slivered

Coconut oil or olive oil - 1TB, generous

Chop up all the vegetables. Place oil in a large skillet and place over medium-low heat. Add in garlic and shallots, cook for a minute. Add in the tempeh and cook for 5-6 minutes until starting to brown. Add in the water chestnuts, sweet peppers, and water chestnuts. Stir and cook for several more minutes. Add in peanuts & stir. Toss in the tamari and stir. Turn off the heat. Take the head of lettuce or radicchio that you are using and slice it off the base and gently peel it off the head, so that each peeled lettuce head makes a "bowl."

Spoon scoopfuls of tempeh mixture into the lettuce bowls and spoon over the plum sauce. Then topped with chopped cilantro and green onions slices. Wrap it up & eat. :)

A summer zucchini soup in a curry-coconut broth

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Today, I leave you with something short.

The first zucchini I ever saw, I killed it with a hoe.”
— John Gould, Monstrous Depravity: A Jeremiad & a Lamentation about Things to Eat, 1963

This soup is one of my favorite dishes. We leave for Guatemala tomorrow and I could not be more excited (stayed toned on a future post featuring.... I don't know... Guatemalan chocolate maybe?). I've been frantically trying to eat up garden produce before we leave. Nothing is sweeter than summer squash straight from the vine (well, maybe summer tomatoes). This dish originally started with making Hedi Swanson's summer squash soup found in her Super Natural Every Day. The first time I made it was when I was living in Charleston, SC. I've been making it for 3 summers now and it has adapted into my own dish. I hope you do the same to yours :).


Recipe (Serve 4 large servings or 6 small)

Curry paste

Turmeric root (fresh) - 2 small numbs, peeled, about 2 - 3 TB

Hot pepper - 1 (deseeded), chopped in half. (I've used every type of hot pepper here. I've tried jalapeño, ghost pepper, habanero, and thai pepper. My favorite is actually the ghost pepper but used whichever pepper you have or to your heat preference.

Garlic - 4 cloves, peeled

Ginger root (fresh) - One small numb, peeled, 1-2 TB

Miso - 2tsp (I used yellow miso)

Soy sauce  - 1 TB (I used tamari)

Shallot - 1 small shallot, peeled  coarsely chopped (I've also used a few TB of red onion when I did not have shallot around)

Lemongrass (fresh) - 1 - 2 small stalks of lemongrass. The papery outer layers discarded. You only want to use the soft/tender inner parts of the lemongrass.

* Place all the curry paste ingredients in a small blender or food processor. I use a small "magic bullet" type blender for this... it just works so well! Blend until smooth & set aside for later.

Soup

Coconut oil - 4.5TB

Vegetable broth - 2.5 cups

Coconut milk - 16 ounce can (I used light but regular would taste wonderful too)

Zucchini - 1 large zucchini, cut into thin half moons

Yellow squash - 1 small, cut into thin half moons

Tofu (extra firm) - pressed & cut into medium chunks

Soy sauce - 1.5 Tb (I used tamari)

Cherry tomatoes - 1 cup, halved

Red onion - 1/4 a small red onion, slivered

Eggplant (optional) - I had a few baby eggplants that I added this time ( 3 baby eggplants), sliced really thin, like 1/8 an inch.

Fresh basil - chopped (any type if basil will work)

Salt - to taste

* Chop up all your ingredients. Place the squashes, eggplant (if using), and red onion in a bowl together. The tofu & cherry tomatoes can remain separate. Place 1.5 Tb of coconut oil in a large skillet and heat on medium heat. Once the oil is hot add all of your squash mixture. Cook over medium heat for 5-8 mins. Until all the vegetables are tender but still have a little crunch. You don't want them too watery & soft. Dump the vegetables back out into a bowl.

Place the skillet back over heat and add 2 TB of coconut oil. Add in your tofu and cook on high, tossing frequently, until the tofu gets brown & crispy. After about 5 - 10 mins of crisping up the tofu add in the soy sauce & toss to combine. Dump out the tofu into the bowl with the squash. Then return the skillet to medium heat & add in your cherry tomatoes. Cook for a min or two until blistered. Then dump into the bowl with the rest of your veggies.

Then get out a medium pot & heat it over medium high heat. Add in your last TB of coconut oil. Once it is hot add in all of your curry paste. Stir to combine & let bubble for 1 min. Then pour in your coconut milk. Stir to combine and let it cook for a min or two, until the coconut milk starts to bubble around the edges. Then add in your veggie broth. Let cook for a few more mins, until the broth is thoroughly heated through & bubbling. Add in your basil (reserve some basil for the top - if desired) & salt to taste (remember the miso & soy sauce is already pretty salty). Distribute the vegetable/ tofu mixture into four bowls. Distribute the brother into the four bowls evenly. Sprinkle basil on top, if using.

Enjoy!

* If you are saving leftovers, I would store the veggies & the broth in separate containers.

Avocado Pizza + Arugula, basil, & lime

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You guys. I won't disappear for months again, OK. I've got it together now. (Fingers crossed). This pizza is surprising. Its creamy rich avocado-y goodness baked into the crust. Balanced by the bitter/sweet arugula/lime/basil topping. OH MY. Seriously. Don't add cheese. It is SO good without. You want to let the beauty of the avocado shine on through.

Keeping on with that plan is another works in Food & Fiction.


SPIDER BY THE LIGHT

A gift in the night

from the spider by the light.

Four soft, tiny wings

fell gently where the door swings.

Spider's full belly

wing skeletons for kelly.

It once was a moth

flying on wings of silk cloth.

Guilt entered my mind

To all but light, moth was blind.

I turned off the light

no capture of moths tonight.

Palm spread eagerly

gathering wings gingerly.

The wings are not waste

death. beauty. forever encased.

A gift in the night

from the spider by the light.


RECIPE - Makes 2 pizzas (feeds 4)

Dough (Slightly adapted from Peter Reinhart's neo-neopolitian pizza dough)

2 Cups + 2TB - unbleached bread flour (or all purp flour)

1/2TB - Honey

3/4tsp - active dry yeast

1 Cup + 1TB - warm water (between 100 - 110 degrees F)

1TB - Olive oil

  1. Combine the warm water, honey, and yeast in a small bowl. Whisk until dissolved & let it sit aside for 5 - 10 minutes until it starts to bubble/foam. Then combine your yeast mixture, flour, & salt into a mixer & mix on low speed for 1 minute with a dough hook. (or mix by hand with a wooden spoon). Then let the dough rest for 5 minutes. This step lets the dough fully hydrate.
  2. Change your mixer speed to medium-low for 2 -3 minutes (or continue mixing by hand). The bread is done when it feels somewhere between tacky & sticky. It should still be really easy to work with. If you feel it is too wet add another TB of flour. If you feel it is to dry, add another TB of water. Turn the dough out onto an oiled sheet pan & divide into two pieces. Form these two pieces into rounds & place equal distance a part on the sheet pan. Cover the top with plastic wrap & place in your fridge overnight.
  3. 1.5 hours ahead of pizza baking time, remove the pizza from the fridge so it has time to warm up & proof in room temperature before baking. Now move onto pizza baking step.

Avocado Base + Toppings

2 - Avocados

4 - garlic cloves, peeled

6TB - Extra Virgin Olive Oil

3 Handfuls - fresh arugula

1 Handful - fresh basil

1/4 - Medium/small red onion, slivered

2 - Limes

Salt/pepper - to taste

  1. After letting the pizza dough ferment in the fridge overnight, take the dough out of the fridge 1.5 hours prior to baking to let it warm up to room temp. Place a baking stone in the oven & preheat it to 500 degrees. If you do not have a baking stone then get out a large baking sheet & lightly oil it, but still preheat your oven to 500 degrees.
  2. In a small blender such as a smoothie blender or small food processor, combine the avocado meats, 5TB oil, garlic cloves, juice of one lime, and a pinch of salt. Blend until smooth. It should be spreadable but still thick. The thickness will depend on the ripeness of your avocados. If you think it is just too thick, thin it out with a tiny bit of water. Set this aside.
  3. In a large bowl toss together your arugula, basil, and red onion. Whisk together the lime juice of your other lime and last TB of olive oil. Toss this together with the arugula mixture and lightly season with salt & fresh ground pepper. Use your hands to toss this mixture together (slightly massaging the greens). Set this aside until later.
  4. Roll out one of the pizza dough rounds on a floured surface and if you are baking using the baking sheet, place on the oiled baking sheet. Top the pizza with half of the avocado mixture & spread evenly with a spoon. Then transfer it into the oven & bake for about 15 -20 minutes (until it is cooked & the crust starts to golden). If you are baking on a pizza stone then open your oven & use a glove to pull out the rack the baking stone is on. Drop on the pizza crust, quickly top with half of the avocado mixture (spreading with a spoon), and close the oven. It will be done in about 10 minutes or less (until it is cooked & starting to golden in spots).
  5. Once the pizza is cooked, remove from oven either with a metal spatula or with mittens & place on a cutting board. Top with half of the arugula mixture, slice, & enjoy!
  6. Repeat process with second pizza dough.


A deep oregano & chile sauce + roasted mushroom tacos

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You should turn me in for neglect. I'm guilty of blog abandonment. I apologize and I want to commit to once-a-week again with you but I don't want to be called out on broken promises and leave you with that empty feeling. For now tacos (as I always say - the perfect food) will fill this physical emptiness. Although, I am sad to say there is still a void to be mentioned. We lost Gabriel Garcia Marquez last month. I want to thank him for his contributions to magical realism with an excerpt from one of his famous novels One Hundred Years of Solitude and of course, with tacos.


When they woke up, with the sun already high in the sky, they were speechless with fascination. Before them, surrounded by ferns and palm trees, white and powdery in the silent morning light, was an enormous Spanish galleon. Tilted and slightly to the starboard, it had hanging from its intact masts the dirty rags of its sails in the midst of its rigging, which was adorned with orchids. The hull, covered with an armor or petrified barnacles and soft moss, was firmly fastened into a surface of stones. The whole structure seemed to occupy its own space, one of solitude and oblivion, protected from the vices of time and the habits of the birds. Inside, where the expeditionaries explored with careful intent, there was nothing but a thick forest of flowers. - Page 11 & 12 One Hundred Years of Solitude  by Gabriel García Márquez


Gabriel García Márquez in 1975. Photograph: Isabel Steva Hernandez/Colita/Corbis

Gabriel García Márquez in 1975. Photograph: Isabel Steva Hernandez/Colita/Corbis


José Arcadio Buendeía had not through that this wife's will was so firm. He tried to seduce her with the charm of his fantasy, with the promise of a prodigious world where all one has to do was sprinkle some magic liquid on the ground and the plants would bear fruit whenever a man wished, and where all manner of instruments against pain were sold at bargain prices. But Úrsula was insensible to his clairvoyance.

"Instead of going around thinking about your crazy inventions, you should be worrying about your sons," she replied. "Look at the state they're in, running wild just like donkeys."

José Arcadio Buendía too his wife's words quite literally. He looked out the window and saw the barefoot children in the sunny garden and he has the impression that only at that instant has they began to exsit, conceived by Úrsula's spell. Something occurred inside of him then, something mysterious and definitive that uprooted him from his own time and carried him adrift though an unexplored region of memory...

...But since the afternoon when he called the children in to help him unpack the things in the laboratory, he gave them his best hours. In the small separate room, where the walls were gradually being covered by strange maps and fabulous drawings, he taught them how to read and write and do sums, and he spoke to them about the wonders of the world, not only where his learning had extended, but forcing the limits of his imagination to extremes. It was in that way that the boys ended up learning  that the southern extremes of Africa there were men so intelligent and peaceful that their only pastime was to sit and think, and that it was possible to cross the Aegean sea on foot by jumping from island to island all the way to the port of Salonika. - Page 13 & 15, One Hundred Years of Solitude  by Gabriel García Márquez



Recipe : Makes a large batch of sauce good for eating with friends or for freezing.

Garlic - 6 cloves, chopped

Sweet onion - 1/2 medium, sliced

Mushroom broth - (or veggie) 2 Cups

Oregano - Dried (3TB)

Pasilla chilies - 3 (dried)

Chipotle chilies - 4 (dried)

Tomato paste - 3 ounces (1/2 a small can)

Diced tomatoes - 16 ounce can

Oregano - fresh (1TB) plus extra to top

Filling

Mushrooms - assortment. (shitakes, portobellos, oyster, cremini), quartered. At least 16ounes for 2-3 servings or more to share with friends!

Garlic - 2-3 cloves, minced

Olive oil - 4-6 TB (depending on how many mushrooms you make)

Salt - to taste

Cilantro - chopped

Avocado - sliced

Lime wedges - optional

Sour cream - optional

* Note: If making homemade tortillas (recipe link below), you might want to make them first to have them ready and reheat. Or make them at the very end to have them piping hot.

Place the mushroom broth in a medium pot over medium heat with the dried oregano and dried chiles ( cut the dried stalks off the chiles). Cover the pot and bring it to a simmer. Then stir the mixture to get everything hydrated and let it sit to infuse, covered, ideally for an hour.

Meanwhile preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Chop up the rest of your veggies for the sauce & filling (garlic, onion, and mushrooms). Toss all the mushrooms in a bowl with the olive oil, 2 -3 cloves of garlic, and some salt. After the mushrooms are coated, spread it on a sheet pan and place into the preheated oven. Roast for 15 minutes and then check on the mushrooms. If there is a ton of liquid in the pan, pour it out, and then return it to the oven for another 15 minutes. Check your mushrooms again. I only needed to roast mine for a total of 30 minutes but, depending on your mushrooms - they might need a little longer.

Now back to the sauce. Once the broth is infused, pour it out into a bowl and set aside. Put the pot back over medium low heat and add in the garlic, onion, and 2TB olive oil. Let them soften, stirring occasionally, for about 10-15 minutes. Add in the tomato paste and do your best to stir/incorporate it with a spoon for a minute. Add in the diced tomatoes and bring it to a simmer, stirring occasionally. Then add in the mushroom broth/chile mixture, stirring, until it reaches a simmer. Once it simmers for a few minutes, pour the mixture into a blender and blend several minutes until smooth. Pour the mixture back into a pot and bring to a simmer and let it cook down into a nice thick sauce for about 10 -15 minutes, scraping the pot frequently. Season with salt.

Place your roasted mushrooms in a corn tortilla (recipe here) and then top, liberally, with sauce. Now you embellish: spoon over some sour cream (if desired), top with avocado slices, sprinkle with cilantro, and squeeze over lime juice. Enjoy with loved ones over magical realism.

Herby, scallion & leek pancakes made with chickpea flour


Story 4 in Food & Fiction


My sketchers were mostly white, a little dusty from the walk. I was now standing with the trees to my back. I peered into the field in front of me. There a large rock had anchored itself into the earth, breaking the horizon. I adjusted the stick resting on my shoulder, the contents in the bandana at the end bounced slightly. So far, this was the farthest I had traveled alone from home before. I watched for ticks on my socks as I moved through the tall grass, just how my Dad showed me. The amber bristles tried to paint my legs as I walked. They tickled past me in waves. I floated across the sea. Drifting steadily towards the island.

The rock was part concrete. It was a ruin? A shipwreck? I inspected the base and found old bits of newspaper stuck to the hardened mixture. I was curious at my discovery. I dropped my bundle, crushing the saltine crackers which were so preciously tucked into my knapsack. It was one of the few items I selected for my journey. I tried to read the bits of newspaper, trying to find clues or a date. It was unreadable and I moved on. There were little imprints of leaves hardened into the concrete. I spent what felt like hours tracing fossilized leaf veins with my finger tips. I loved my rock, it was my secret of unknown histories. I climbed on top of my ship and looked out at my grass ocean. It swayed gently, the waters were calm. I sat down and hugged my legs to my chest and sipped on a mini plastic bottled water I brought. I marooned myself.

After awhile I poked through my supplies and I sprinkled the crushed saltines in the grass for the birds. The last thing I packed was my journal. I stared at the cover. It was denim with a rhinestone butterfly. I opened the inside cover and read my own hand, it said "Do not read. Please." I obeyed my own rule and closed the journal. I tried to remember why I came out here by myself, why I wanted to run away. I had been angry, that is all. I could not remember anymore, all that mattered was my oasis. A silent place with something no one else found interesting. From my lookout I saw a car coming down the road that cut through the field. The car kicked up a cloud behind it. I jumped down and hid behind my rock... I did not want to expose my location. The car passed and my hideout was safe. I folded the journal back up into the bandana and tied it in a knot at the end of my stick, like I had seen in cartoons. I began to worry that sharing my saltine crackers with the birds was a mistake... a grave error in my operation. I knew there was more food back at the house... but should I return?

I looked back from where I had come, I could see my house from behind the trees. It's red brick peaking through the planted evergreens.  I wasn't far away from my home after all. I could come back to my oasis whenever in need. I headed back towards the tree harbor... to shallower grass waters of the back yard. I had not even been gone an hour.

Years later, long after the rock was hauled away, the field was leveled, homes were built, and I had moved away; I would think about that oasis. Some things, like that rock, just exist somewhere out-of-place. But really, they are exactly where they need to be.

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Recipe (Servers 2)

Chickpea Flour - 3/4 Cup

Baking powder - 1TB

Egg - 1

Butter - 4TB, melted

Milk - 2/3 Cup

Ground coriander - 1 tsp

Fresh Herbs - 1/3 cup - 1/2 cup, chopped. (I used dill, cilantro, and parsley)

Olive oil - 1TB

Leek - 1 - sliced into thin half rounds

Scallions - 3, sliced thin (using both the white & the green part)

Garlic - 2 cloves, minced

Salt/pepper - to taste

Chard - 1/2 a bundle (enough for a handful or two), chopped

Lemon juice - 1/2 a fresh lemon (scant 1TB)

Butter or coconut oil (of other fat/oil) to coat pan for cooking pancakes

Chop up  leeks, scallions, herbs, and garlic, then set aside. Trim and chop up the chard into slivers. Place in a bowl with the lemon juice and a tiny pinch of salt & drizzle of olive oil. Toss the chard and then place in the fridge to marinate while you make the rest.

Add the 1TB olive oil to a medium skillet on medium low heat. Let it get warm and them add the garlic, toss for a minute, then add the scallions & leeks. Cook, tossing occasionally, for several minutes to soften. Turn off the heat and then dump the mixture into a bowl. Set these cooked onions aside for now.

In a large bowl mix together the chickpea flour, baking powder, coriander, 1/2tsp of salt, and a 1/2tsp of pepper. Stir this together and then make a well in the center. Add the egg, milk, and melted butter. Combine well with a fork until the batter is smooth and there are no lumps. Add in the cooked scallion mixture and fresh chopped herbs. Combine well.

Heat a small amount of butter or other oil in the same medium skillet - just enough to coat the surface - over medium heat. Once warm, place a heaped 1/4 cup serving of batter into the skillet. Let it cook several minutes, until bubbles are coming up in the center of the pancake. Flip and then cook a few more minutes on the other side. Repeat this with the rest of the batter.

Serve the pancakes warm with a generous handful of lemony chard piled on top. You can also serve with a dollop of high-quality sour cream or creme fraiche. This is completely optional. Next time I'd go without - but it makes the photos look nice! Makes two large servings.


No-pity bright winter salad: Cabbage + Arugula + Lemon + Olives + Dill

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Khaos

(a series in food & fiction by Kelly Ridenhour)


I did not know what to expect when I asked my shadow the question. I did not even know if it would work. It was the book that convinced me to try or that is my excuse. Truthfully, it was my longing for something unrealistic to be... not so unrealistic. If I did not work in a library where more books than I could ever possibly read surrounded me, I would never have found the book; the book that led me to the question. I couldn't help but wander long silent corridors and sweetly brush my fingertips along the spines of hardbound books. In lonely corridors I would break dust for the first time in decades. The pleasant dust, a crisp crust on fine crème brûlée. Inside a library, your mind wanders. It is suppose to wander. As an employee, the library's silence, the endless comfort of rows, the organization, it either becomes a meditation provoking thought or something that stirs chaos. 

On the day I found the book, I felt its draw, like a beacon shinning out from the sea of muted books. It was a dusty gray color, the color of muted night sky. The book became a secret I harbored. I could see its history on the backside of the front cover. I always feel a little pity when I discover a book like this one. A book whose existence no one knows of or an existence long forgotten. The inside cover was white, virgin, no inked dates to mar its page. The book's knowledge was all mine and I felt its gratitude. This book was not the type of book the people in my community want me to read. It made the secret dangerous and intoxicating. It was called Nyx. It is a book dripping with modern magic and Greek mythology. I would take the secret out underneath the apple groves that dotted the Utah landscape and read listening to the sound of irrigation runnels. Everything would become still in those hours, so still I became part of the landscape. The deer treated me as they did the apple trees, a solid object, part of nature.

I read for days about gods and goddesses of Greek mythology and the way those concepts and ideas have translated into modern life. Something I never learned before, it did not exist in my world. I was astonished that the ancient Greeks believed in these gods. It was not the incredulousness of these gods but the impressiveness of the things Greeks did to show their affections and loyalty; the things they built! I could not help but feel cheated. How exciting would a world be when filled with mythical creatures, gods who shoot arrows of love, nymphs, goddesses... and a world with scandals between gods and mortals? Even if these gods and goddesses were not real, the attentiveness of the Greeks made them real. I began to wonder about the realities of my own world and the one God that I worship and if someone would discover a book about my beliefs and my God 2,500 years from now. 

In Nyx the author discussed rituals and practices of the Greeks. There was one bit that stuck with me and my brain grew with questions. One question led me to my shadow. A shadow is not just one thing by itself; it is many things. It is light, it is dark, it is the ground, it is you, and it is air. The landscape in this combination is air. Air in Greek mythology is not necessarily one god. Air is the space where everything happens and it is the oldest of all gods, it is Khaos or as we know it, chaos. Shadow has been with everyone, at all times. It was there 2,500 years ago when the Greeks lived and it is here with you now. Think of all it has seen, all of the places it has been, all the space it has occupied and all the chaos that has passed through it. Filled with questions and too dark to read.

Despite what you believe, you know the powers of a full moon, or at least you are aware of the myth. If I told you the full moon produces a special kind of shadow would you believe me? No? You want to believe me don't you? That is how I feel when reading the book. I want to believe everything. Something so different from my world, something to pull me out and take me away. There is not one specific idea that convinced me I could ask my shadow any question I wanted under the strength of a full moon and in return, I would get an answer. It was more an accumulation of knowledge and feeling. Ideas put into practice. I felt my evenings in the apple grove grow more powerful as the moon waxed. I wanted to ask my shadow is magic is real, if myth was real.... and if it was there was it would be myth no longer, it would be chaos. My life as I know it turned on its side and my realities lost. I wanted that. On the night of the full moon I wandered into the apple grove, my shadow faithfully trailing me. I asked my question.

I won't tell you what happened. All I can tell you is that your realities are what you make them. I toss you my apple, I give you the chaos of asking questions.


I can't explain how much I love this salad. It is inspired from my favorite salad in a little greek restaurant near my parent's house. I love to eat it by itself or wrapped up in some flatbread. Or eaten with a side of  flatbread & hummus. Make it your own. It may sound simple but, seriously, it doesn't need any pity :).

Recipe (1 large salad or several small salads)

Green cabbage - 1/4 head of cabbage on the generous side, shaved or slivered

Arugula - 2 big handfuls

Red onion - 1/4 onion, shaved or slivered

Kalamata olives - 6-8, the meat cut off the pits

Olive oil - 2TB

Garlic - 1 clove, small, minced (optional - I don't event do this all the time)

Lemon - juice of 1 lemon

Dill - 2Tb, fresh, chopped fine

Salt/pepper - to taste

Toss together all ingredients & kind of gently massage the greens with the juices & herbs. Eat right away... or it tastes even better after it sits in the fridge and the flavors infuse for 15-30mins or so. Enjoy.

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Creamy grit bowls with roasted broccoli, poached eggs, & dill

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I'm not sure why I went into the fog. There was something beautiful about the way it creeped. The way it crawled. A slow moving breath that had a thousand floating legs. As if someone was controlling the fog on a silent crank. It dipped down and up the hills of the farm, a caress between the fog and the ground. It was alluring. I could hear voices coming out of it. At first they were whispers. Sweet whispers. They made me remember a time long ago. It crept closer and I could no longer see the pines in the distance. I knew I should go back home, I had things to do. My legs didn't move as fast as they did years ago. A frost was setting in and the grass crunched beneath my feet. The fog gained on me, I could feel its tickle on my skin. 

"Bill! Where are you? Bill?"

He liked to spend a few moments alone on the bench by the lake the mornings, he was such a quiet man. I love that about him. A quite confidence. I didn't like to be without him for long. Years back we abandoned our individuals.

"Bill!"

The fog was thick around me now. It was a blanket; dense, soft, and familiar. I needed to make the cake. We had the kids coming over later for dinner, it was Bill's birthday. Chocolate birthday cake, it was tradition. Bill and I would eat the leftover cake with coffee over the next several mornings, I was looking forward to this. Our kids always declined to take leftover cake with them because they know our sugary secret. When they were children, it was all we could do to prevent them from finishing the cake in one night.

The fog was so thick now it was dizzying. I was lost in a cloud. I sat down on the grass to stop my head from spinning. I was still thinking of birthday traditions. The children... oh how they loved that cake too. I needed to get them to sign the birthday card for Dad. They would scribble in their names and cover the envelope with hearts and XOs. Each of them would have something small they made out of the craft box at home and, beaming, would give it to their Dad. I really needed to get back, the children had been alone for too long! Why did I wander so far?

"Bill!" I yelled. "Bill, where are you?"

The fog started to clear. The pines in the distance reappeared. I stood up and started in the direction of home.

"Bill!"

The fog was thinning quickly, just as quick as it came. I could see a man walking towards me in the distance, wisps of fog making his figure fade in an out. Oh how silly of me. I remembered that the kids weren't young anymore, they were grown. I had no card for them to sign, there would be no crafted gifts. Sometimes I forget.

"BIll! There you are! I need to make the cake."

The last bits of the fog passed away and I reached the man. It was not Bill.

"Mom, I'm not Bill. Bill isn't here anymore remember? Maybe you shouldn't take walks too far away from home anymore. I could hear you shouting for Bill. Are you OK?"

"Oh yes honey, I'm OK, it was the fog... I got confused."

"It is alright Mom, lets go back. We have some Chocolate cake inside."

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Recipe (serves 2)

Grits - 1/2 cup (on the generous side)

Cream - 1/4 cup (on the generous side)

Water - 1 and 3/4 cup

Broccoli - 1 head, chopped off the stalk into smaller pieces

Scallions - 1/2 a bunch, slivered

Garlic - 2 Cloves, minced

Dill - 2TB, fresh, minced

Eggs - 2

Lemon juice - juice of 1 lemon

Olive oil - 2TB

Apple cider vinegar - 1TB

Salt/pepper - to taste

Lemon zest, extra dill, extra scallions - to top (optional)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Take two eggs out of the fridge and let them rest on the counter. Chop & prep all veggies.  Toss together the broccoli, garlic, scallions, fresh dill, lemon juice, olive oil, and salt/pepper. Spread the broccoli on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for about 30 minuets, flipping half way through. Meanwhile, place the grits, water, cream, and a pinch of salt in a small saucepan, covered, over low heat. Let it slowly simmer until cooked about 20-30 mins, stirring occasionally. After it is cooked, season with fresh black pepper.  

About 10 mins before the grits are done, put about 2 inches of water in a deep skillet with the apple cider vinegar, and heat over medium until it starts simmering. Lower the temperature just a bit to keep the water at a low simmer. Crack one egg into a small bowl or ramekin. Gently slip the egg out of the ramekin into the skillet of simmering water and cook for 5 minuets, so all the whites are set but the yolks runny. Meanwhile distribute the grits between two serving bowls and top with broccoli mixture. Remove cooked egg with a slotted spoon and place over the bowl of grits & broccoli. Repeat with the second egg. Top the bowls with lemon zest, more dill & scallions if desired. 

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Cardamom spice pudding + Rosewater scented whipped cream

Plights.

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When I started this blog I had grand ideas and visions of combining the folklore of food with recipes in every post. Despite my love for reading and learning the beginnings of specific dishes, the folklore surrounding herbs, and the strange stories of food; it is a difficult task. With all this reading, I can't help but be motivated to write. Not just to write anything but to write description, to write fiction. I am called to the endless creations that are born from unreality. I love to sit with a meal and read a fiction, a fairytale, or watch a movie. Eating and cooking food can be (and should be) a personal, and creative event. So many of us flock to recipes, cookbooks, blogs, publications because we are drawn to it; as we are drawn into a good novel. I want to re-evaluate my time here. I've been working on small fictions... little stories spun from the threads of travel, fantasy, and the outdoors. I want to bring you a meal, a delicious meal, and a story with each post. I want to feed your belly, feed your soul, and feed your imagination. This also will prove to be a difficult task but, I want it. It is true to me. I am approaching one-year of blogging here in a few months. It seems appropriate that I come full circle on the idea behind LORE. Here is a warming winter story with a warming winter pudding. A  fiction and food.

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Plights

Flecks of splintered red berries exploded on the ground as I sat on my pebble. Globs of red goop stained the white snow and splattered across my trousers. The crow perched above was the source of the mess, with a fresh meal of winterberries.

“Out of all the trees in the forest…he picks this one. Pinecones… the gall of that bird” I mumbled to no one.

I flicked the chunks of fruit off my clothes and wiped my hands clean.

"Would you cut it out?" I yelled up.

 

The crow continued to gorge himself. It was the response I expected. I wrapped up the remains of my mushroom stalk. I only had time for a few mice sized bites from it and appropriately so, after all, I am a mouse. My lunch break was over and I still had twenty more trees to fit in before the day ended. This year was particularly busy for tree-tuners. As if our job of solving plant growth problems wasn’t difficult enough. We were the ones to fix the plants when they  didn’t follow in line with the climate. Replacing bits of their internal clocks so that they could grow properly.  

 

The unusual changes in the weather had the trees’ internal clocks all out of whack; like a groundhog without a burrow. I was headed down the hill towards a cluster of oak trees still holding onto their leaves and acorns, despite the snow on the ground. I knew exactly which gear needed replacing and before the day was over, the oaks would be set right; their leaves would begin to shed by nightfall. The squirrels over in thicket knoll had lodged the complaint… in their family, they didn’t like climbing trees to fetch acorns. Some squirrels they are.

 

Tree-tuning happened to be a very old profession, usually passed on through families… but it was very stressful. The forest population is always keen to complain when the redbud flowers dropped too soon or their favorite gumballs are rotten. They always let me know when things aren’t right but when they are, they never say thanks. Would it really have been so difficult for that greedy crow to have said thank you and taken his mess over to the next tree? Especially after I spent three hours hammering out a custom brass piece for the winterberry bushes per the crows’ request? No one knows the plight of a tree-tuner. I felt like the most disrespected critter in the forest.

 

I scurried along towards thicket knoll. The path was beaten down; it had been well traveled that morning, the dark bed of leaf matter showing from underneath the snow. I hoped to spend my time working in solitude, and my interaction with the crow was enough for one day. I rounded the bend heading down into the blackberry thicket, quickly passing by the thorny stalks that hung dormant like skeletons.

 

“Oh, thank goodness!” A voice called out from the quiet.

“I worried I’d be stuck her all day before someone came by. Could you please help me? Some of my bristles are stuck.”

 

I looked around, clearly, I was the only critter about; I had to respond. I sighed, once again, someone needed me to fix something.

 

“Hhumm. Yes, of course, just a moment.”

 

I rumbled through my toolbox for the woodcutters and then scampered into the thicket. After my eyes adjusted to the change of light I looked around for the source of the voice. There, stuck in a net of broken brambles, was a woolly bear caterpillar.

 

Great. I thought. These things are always so cheery. I’ll just work quick to free him and be on my way.

 

“Just a few snips…. one there…  and you’re loose.” I turned to leave.

 

The caterpillar celebrated. “Thank you! Oh, just great! Wait… don’t leave, I haven’t really thanked you yet. Hey, wait, where are you going? Can I come?” Without turning around I stopped and rolled my eyes.

 

Hesitantly I responded. “Well, I suppose, come on then.”

 

I waited for him to catch up and we moved down the path together.  The woolly bear followed after me, the ripple in his bristles rolled through his body as he moved. I wanted to make the trip quick; walking with the woolly does not help my reputation. The woolly bear caterpillars are the most hated in the forest. It is believed that the color of their bristles makes the winter long and cold. If their stripe is narrow like it is this winter, they are hated, for it brings a severe winter. At least the confused oaks weren’t too far ahead and I would be rid of the woolly.

 

“So, it was lucky you had all those tools with you, what do you do?” The woolly asked, gasping a little as he walked.

 

“Oh. Those. Well, it really isn’t that interesting.” If I told him I was a tree-tuner, I didn’t want to hear about what herb or plant he needed me to correct.

 

“Sure it is! I mean I’m a caterpillar. I don’t have much going for me until I’ve transformed. Try me.”

 

He did have a point.

 

“I’m a tree-tuner.” I said quietly.

 

“Fabulous! What a wonderful job – being outdoors everyday, meeting all of the other forest creatures, talking, having responsibility…” The woolly went on with compliments “… not to mention solving problems!”

 

I cut in “Stop it. You have NO idea what it is like!” Oh Mr. Mouse, says the woodpecker, this tree was suppose to die last week and we haven’t been able to move in yet. Mr. Mouse, where are the crocus blossoms? Mr. Mouse, this tree only has one fruit. Mr. Mouse this is supposed to be an evergreen. Mr. Mouse where are the leaves? Mr. Mouse. Mr. Mouse. Mr. Mouse. Mr. Mouse! Pinecones! Where is the thank you Mr. Mouse, thank you?! Tell me that!

 

The woolly caterpillar was silent for once. I’m sure he had never considered my discomforts. Serves him right, what did he know?

 

“Mr. Mouse. Thank you, truly, the forest owes much to you.” The caterpillar sniffled.

 

I was stunned. I didn’t expect to receive gratitude. Now that I had it, I was not really sure what to do with it.

 

The woolly continued “—and not just for  your work as a tree-tuner… thank you for stopping to help me… thank you for not blaming me for your troubles. I’m sure you know I am not among the most liked in the forest. The others blame me for the weather, based on my appearance. They say it is my fault that the winter is too long or too cold but my brown band is not something I can control. What can you do when animals only value your appearance? They blame me for their discomforts. Do they even know that winter is hardest on the wooly caterpillars? Do you know that I will freeze solid for all the months in winter? I might as well be a rock. Actually, as a rock I would not be hated.”

 

Pinecones! I had never thought of how the woolly feels. How could I do this? I sit here day after day, complaining that no one knows how I feel. I’ve never considered the wooly, or the squirrel, or the rabbit, or the crow. I suddenly feel as if I am no good at fixing problems. No one can fix a problem alone.

 

“Woolly bear, would you like to learn how to tune a tree?” I asked.

 

The woolly bear brightened up instantly. “Oh, would I! There isn’t anything I’d rather do more.”

 

The forest was never silent of stories about mouse and caterpillar. No longer were the complaints for mouse or woolly alone. It was all about what they could accomplish together, for neither of them had to travel their plights alone.

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Recipe (Makes 5 puddings)

Whole milk - 1.5 cups

Half & half or light cream - 1 cup

Heavy whipping cream - 1 cup (for whipped cream, optional)

Sugar - 1/3 cup + 3TB

Rosewater - 1TB

Cardamom pods - 1TB heaped, slightly crushed

Cardamom seeds - 1tsp

Ground cardamom - pinch or two (optional... for extra cardamom flavor)

Cinnamon stick - 2

Peppercorns - a small pinch

Cornstarch - 3TB

Fresh or dried edible rose petals and ground cinnamon - to adorn, optional

Put the whole milk, 1/2 a cup of the light cream, and spices (except the ground cardamom) in a pot over medium heat. Cook covered until it just begins to simmer and then turn off the heat and leave it covered. Let this sit so the spice can infused for at least 30 mins. Then strain the milk mixture through a sieve, reserve the milk and discard the spices (or you can infuse the spices in a tea ball or bag for easy removal). In a bowl whisk together the other 1/2 cup of cold light cream and cornstarch until it is dissolved.

Put the spice-infused milk back into the pot with the 1/3 cup + 2TB of sugar, salt, and ground cardamom and set over medium-low heat and bring it back to just before simmering. Whisk in the cornstarch-milk mixture. Let it cook, alternating frequently between stirring & whisking, until it barley boils.. this will take about 5 minuets. Once it starts to reach a boil, turn the temperature down to low and stir/whisk frequently for another 5 minuets... it will thicken considerably. The pudding is done when it will completely coat the back of a wooden spoon and drip off in globs. Distribute into 5 teacups or ramekins and put into the refrigerator for a few hours to set (or eat it as-is if you like it loose). Cover the teacups with plastic wrap if you do not want skin on your pudding. After the pudding has chilled in the fridge and just before serving, put your heaving whipping cream into a mixture with the whisk attachment. Turn onto medium low and after the mixture gets foamy, increase the speed to high & add your rosewater & sprinkle in 1TB of sugar. Beat it until stiff peaks form. Distribute the whipped cream over the pudding (you will have some left-over whipped cream) and sprinkle with rose petals & ground cinnamon - if desired. 

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Winter fresh rolls with edamame paste & chile carrots

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As I write I am listening to the mixed sound of soft thud & sharp pops that comes from the wintery mix beating down on the skylight above my head. Last night, I kept waking up in the early morning and doing a quick peak outside, hoping for snow, and disappointedly I would snuggle back into bed. I really wanted to see my dogs' paws and noses happily buried into the fluffy snow, I wanted to make oatmeal cookies and hot cocoa and I wanted to curl up by the fire and read fairy tales. Alas, the sleet and ice is here, snow will have to wait until next week. While a good portion of the country is under snow and ice right now, you think I'd have something like hearty warm soups, or a cassoulet, or perhaps a veggie packed shepherd's pie. Nope, I have for you spring rolls.... well, winter rolls. 

After Thanksgiving marathon eating and the patchwork of holiday parties and gatherings that come over these next 3 weeks... some lighter food is needed in between the decadence! Don't worry, the ample amount of ginger and the addition of spicy chile carrots make these fresh rolls satisfying on a winter's day. Unfortunately I did't get many in-process photos... winter's darkness creeps up on us quite quickly. So I'm providing some photos of-late via my iphone :). Don't worry, one of the next posts I have in mind will be extremely winter-appropriate and warming to boot. 

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*Also if you don't want to make these all at once, store the carrots & edamame past in separate container in the fridge and then just assemble to order. :)

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Winter rolls (Makes 15)

Spring roll wrappers - I got a packet of 15

Edamame - 16 ounce bag of frozen/shelled edamame

Scallions - 3 scallions, chopped

Light coconut milk - do not shake it - 1 can - use just the top 1/3 portion - the thick, white part

Garlic - 4 cloves - grated on a microplane or minced really fine

Ginger - 1-2 TB (depending on taste) I used closer to 2TB -grated on a microplane or minced really fine

Greens - a small handful or two of dark greens (I used baby kale)

Carrots - 1lb bag - peeled & julienned

Sesame oil - 1Tb

Rice vinegar - 3Tb

Soy sauce - 1Tb plus extra for dipping (I use tamari)

Mirin - 1-2 tsp

Sesame seeds - 1TB, I used black sesame seeds

Dried arbol chiles - chopped fine, plus a few extra seeds or substitute dried chile flakes

Salt - to taste

Hot water

* This would be extra yummy if you let the chili carrots sit in the fridge overnight, or a few hours, to get extra spicy, but it is an optional step.

Peel & julienne the carrots and place into a bowl. In a separate, small bowl, whisk together the sesame oil, rice vinegar, tamari, mirin, sesame seeds, & dried chile. Pour the sauce over the carrots and stir together with your hands, massaging in the sauce as you go. Set the carrots aside. 

Set on a medium pot of water over high heat to boil. Meanwhile chop up your scallions, grate or mince your garlic & ginger and add these into a blender or food processor. Once the water is boiling, dump in your bag of edamame. Let the edamame cook a few minutes until they are not longer frozen and they are soft and bright green. Drain the edamame really well and then add it to your blender or food processor. Add in the coconut milk to the edamame mixture and a good pinch of salt. Process the mixture until it is well combined and smooth, stopping and scraping as needed. Taste and adjust for salt. Dump the mixture into a bowl and set it aside with your carrots.

Heat up enough hot water to fill a large bowl halfway, so you can dip the rice papers in easily. Prepare a clean work surface for rolling your spring rolls and set out your rice wrappers, bowl for hot water, bowl of edamame paste with a spoon, greens, bowl of carrots, and a clean platter. Once the water is done heating, pour it into your prepared bowl. Now you are ready to assemble. Dip one of the rice wrapper into the bowl of water until it starts to "melt" and get really soft and translucent. Takes about 20 seconds or so (If the water if too hot to handle, throw in an ice cube or two). Pull the rice wrapper out and lay flat on your prepared surface. Smear on a spoonful or two of the edamame paste across the center of the rice wrapper... stopping and inch or so from the edges. Add in a little pinch of fresh greens and a small handful of carrots, all the while stopping about and inch from the edges. Fold in the side edges of the spring roll and then grab the end closet to you and fold it over the center ingredients, tucking and rolling it over on itself until it becomes a roll! Yay! Place on the clean platter and then repeat with the other 14 rice wrappers. Serve with a bowl of tamari for dipping.

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Aushak, for the vegetarian

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I've explained my love for Afghan food in an earlier post here. One of the most interesting things about Afghan food is the significance it has with family. Most families have versions of dishes such as Aushak (or ashak) and curries that are unique to that family. Traditions past on through the act of doing, sharing, eating rather than through recipe notecards and magazines. One beautiful aspect of Afghan meal time is the dastarkhan. The "space" for eating a meal. Sometimes (I believe usually with larger family gatherings and special guests) a dastarkhan is used to set the space for eating. It is a piece of fabric or tablecloth spread across the floor and then arranged with the various dishes, bread, curries, rice, meats, and beverage, usually tea. The dastarkhan is a sacred space, not to be walked across or sat upon, just a place that holds the sacredness of enjoying and sharing a meal with family. Often, there is a designated tea poured and food server because these jobs have meaning, even the arrangement of food is taken into consideration; it all has significance.

In our home, our table is typically strewn across with bits and pieces of whatever project I've been working on lately or whatever was in my hands when I walked in the door. Books, bags, laptops, keys, papers, glues, labels, mail, boxes... these all frequent my table more than actual food. I can spend so much time enjoying the preparation of the meal and, in the end, eating it can feel more of an afterthought because I don't bring the sacredness of enjoying a meal. Sometimes I have to clear a little placemat sized space open on the table just to eat... or we forgo it all and eat bowls of soup cuddled on the couch under a blanket. Don't get me wrong, couch eating has its place, but I should put as much intention into eating the food and enjoying the time to quite the mind, as I do while preparing the food. I feel as eating in a space with intention helps us to remain present. 

This aushak is delicious and, I promise, simple. It varies from the traditional a bit, but like I said, each family has their own version. It is typically a leek filled dumpling served with a yogurt sauce, spiced ground meat topping, and dried mint. This version combines leeks and scallions, steamed in peppery broth, and topped with a garlic-mint yogurt. Its wonderful and best enjoyed in a sacred space. If you do not want to make all the dumplings at once. Reserve the left over fillings and wonton wrappers separate. Already steamed dumplings do not keep well, so steam to order :). You can, of course, make your own pasta dough here, but this time I choose the quicker version of using pre-made wonton wrappers.

 

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Aushak (Makes about 35-40 dumplings)

Wonton wrappers - 1 package (at least 40 inside)

Leeks - 3 large, trimmed and chopping into thin half-moons

Scallions - 1 bunch, trimmed and sliced into thin rounds

Cayenne pepper - scant 1tsp, ground

Garlic - 3 cloves, minced very fine or grated in a microplane

Yogurt - 1/2 cup plain whole-milk yogurt or greek yogurt

Mint - 2-3TB fresh, plus extra to garnish

Coconut oil - 3TB (Or evoo)

Whole pepper kernels - 1tsp

Mushroom (or veggie) broth - 2Cups (plus a little extra, if needed)

Salt/pepper - to taste

 

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Stir together the yogurt, 2 cloves worth of the garlic, and the fresh mint in a small bowl. Sprinkle in a pinch of salt and pepper and stir again, sit it aside for later. 

In a large skillet heat up the coconut oil on medium high heat. Add in the other clove of minced or grate garlic and the leeks/onions. Cook stirring frequently until softened. At least 5 minuets. You want them to be soft and buttery tasting but not mushy. Season with the cayenne and some salt and then turn off the heat. 

Heat up a medium skillet with a lid with 2 cups of the broth sprinkled with the whole peppercorns on medium low. You want to bring this mixture to a simmer and keep it there, keep it covered. Get out the wonton wrappers and a little bowl or cup of water. Lay out your wonton wrappers individually onto a clean surface. Spoon a small spoonful of the leek mixture into the center of each of the wontons. Then dip your finger into the water and spread two connecting edges of the wonton wrapper (one wonton at a time) with a strip of water. Fold the dry edges of the wonton wrapper over onto the wet edges, making a triangle and pinch together to seal. Make sure you only spread the water on one wonton at a time because the water will soak up/dry out so you need to fold it over right after you wet it. Repeat the process with all of your wontons. (If you aren't making all of them make sure you wrap the wonton wrappers up well so they don't dry out and keep the leek mixture separate). 

Once the broth is simmering, lay in the wonton wrappers in one flat layer, try not to let them touch or they will cook together. You will need to do this in batches. Return the cover to the skillet and let them simmer/steam in the broth for 3 minuets. You might, occasionally need to add in a little more broth as you cook the dumplings in batches, in case too much steams out. Removed from the broth with a spatula and lay on a plate, drizzle with the yogurt sauce and sprinkle with extra chopped mint, if desired, and serve warm. 

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Roasted beets & lemon greens wrap

Horror!

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All she could hear was her breathing. Everything else was silent. She set down the knife. It was red with crime. An un-blooded portion of the knife reflected her own face and glimpses of the carnage in front of her. She never knew she could be so violent. Heads chopped off from bodies and dismembered, there across the table and floor, was her proof. She gently and calmly wiped her hands clean with a rag; it was a white rag. The red soaked in deep, binding with the fibers, the contrast seemed to make her violence more permanent, more dramatic. She had been hungry before, and had simply set out to make a meal... before...

The phone range.

"Hello?"

"Hey, sweetheart, I'm on my way home. Do you want me to grab dinner?"

She glanced behind her at her crime, ripe with juices, and nibbled at a bit of red on her fingernail. It was sweet. Her heart should be pounding but she felt nothing was wrong. In fact, she felt the opposite. A different type of hunger began to grow in her...

"Oh, no, love. I'm making something at home for us." She hung up the phone.

She set to work cleaning up her mess; trimming and cutting away at the bodies, forming them into manageable pieces. It was an unusual meal. She pondered over a recipe, something simple. All that chopping had left her tired. Tired and hungry. Maybe... roasted in their own juices until tender? Salt and pepper of course, oh and olive oil! Certainly, olive oil! A little lemon to make the flavor pop. 

The smells from the oven were heavenly. She salivated. The dogs were in the kitchen licking at the floor in their primal states. Waiting for more tasty morsels to drip from the counter.

The door open and he walked in. He saw the red soaked cutting board and her stained hands. He stopped. 

"You're making beet wraps!"

Whoever thinks vegetarianism can't be gruesome has never cut their way through two bunches of fresh beets. 

This wrap is great, I've made it a few times and it has turned a beet hater (Ty) into a roasted beet lover. 

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Recipe (About 6 wraps)

Beets (with greens) - 2 bunches. Beets trimmed into thin rounds and save the greens)

Red onion - 1/4 cup, slivered

Goat cheese - 6TB (about 1TB per serving)

Lemon - Juice from 1 large lemon

Olive oil - 3TB

Salt/pepper - to taste 

Yogurt Flatbread (adapted from plenty)

Flour (any flour, this time I used spelt) - Generous 2 cups

Baking powder - 1TB

Salt - 1tsp

Whole fat plain yogurt (or greek) - 1 1/2 cups

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Begin with making your flatbread dough (or use a pre-made flatbread). Mix together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Then stir in your yogurt with a wooden spoon until the dough becomes workable with your hands. Knead for a few minuets. If the dough seems a little too sticky or dry, add in a little more flour. Cover the bowl and let it chill in your fridge while you prepare the rest of the wrap.

Wash and chop up the beets into thin rounds and put them into a bowl. Slice up the beet greens into slivers, discarding any extra tough stems and place them into a separate bowl. Add in the slivered onions to the beet greens. Squeeze over the fresh lemon juice into the greens and sprinkle with a small pinch or two of salt. Massage the lemon and salt into the greens and then set the bowl aside.

Now back to the beets. Toss the beets with the 3TB of olive oil and at least a teaspoon of salt & pepper each. Lay the beet slices out on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for about 20 minuets, until cooked and tender, stirring the beets half way through. 

While beets are roasting, go back to your dough and divide it into six balls. Heat up a skillet (cast iron works great here) on the stove top over high heat. Clean a work surface and sprinkle with flour. Place one ball on your floured surface and roll it out thin, into a round flatbread. Once your skillet is very hot, lay your flatbread on the skillet. When it starts to bubble up, flip the bread. When it starts to puff up with air, it is done and remove from the skillet. Repeat with the other 5 dough balls. 

After the breads are cooked and the beets roasted spread the center of a flatbread with 1Tb or more of goat cheese. Lay on top 1/6 of the beets and then top with a big handful of lemon greens. Repeat with others! The lemon greens and beets keep well when stored separately. Enjoy!

 

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Cauliflower Caldo Verde

Autumn. 

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This week was an explosion. After the cold spell of last weekend and our first hard frost, the leaves decided that it was Autumn. Sprays of orange, red, and yellow arched over all the roadways and street trees, their clipped canopies look like brightly colored Christmas ornaments dangling over the sidewalk. I love this weather. The forests get excited too, dressing up for a fancy party once a year. I get equally as giddy, how could you not with all these fancy, well-dressed trees around? Fall time is where energy is directed downwards, into the roots, a very building time of year. I've rooted down deep into the things that I am doing, and I am building them. Enjoying my job, building my side business (Forest Things), and working here in the space. I'm excited for this fall time, for root building, and for soup eating.

This soup is vegetarian take on a portuguese soup called caldo verde. It is usually a potato soup with sausage and kale or collard greens. I've adapted my recipe from this recipe on food52. I was particularly drawn to it because cooking cauliflower with paprika is one of my favorites, something my grandmother use to to a lot when I was a kind. Served steamed, drizzled with melted butter and paprika. Delicious. 

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Recipe (Makes 6 servings) 

Cauliflower - 1 large head, chopped into pieces

Yellow Onion - 1 medium onion slivered

Garlic - 2 large cloves, minced

Mushrooms - 1/2 heaped cup, chopped

Mushroom broth - 4 cups

Collard greens - 1 bunch, tough parts of the stalk removed and then slivered

Lemon juice - juice from 1 lemon

Olive oil - 5TB

Paprika - about 2TB

Cumin - about 2TB

Cayenne - 1-2tsp

Salt - to taste

Toasted pine nuts - to top (optional) 

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Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and chop/prep your cauliflower, onions, mushrooms, and garlic. Toss the chopped cauliflower in a bowl with 2TB olive oil, 1TB of the paprika, 1TB of the cumin, 1tsp of cayenne, and then a few good pinches of salt. Lay the cauliflower out on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 30 minuets, turning half way through. 

Meanwhile, heat up 2TB of olive oil in a large pot on medium and add in your garlic and onions. Cook and caramelize your onions for about 20 minuets, stirring frequently. Then add your chopped mushrooms and cook stirring frequently for another 10 minuets.

Once the cauliflower is done roasting, pour a little liquid into the pan to de-glaze. Then scrape the cauliflower and loosen the stuck-on bits into the pot of onions and add in the mushroom broth. Simmer for 10 minuets. Place the soup into a blender and blend for a minuet or two, until smooth (or use an immersion blender if available). Add the soup back into the pot and keep on low, adding in a little water to thin out the soup to the desired consistency. Taste and adjust for spices adding more salt first. Then add in the rest of the paprika & cumin and the cayenne if needed. 

Heat up the last TB of olive oil in a medium skillet on medium heat and add in the collard greens, tossing as you cook for several minuets. Add in the lemon juice and salt, cooking it until it is wilted but still vibrant and green. 

Add the collard greens into the soup and stir. Ladle the soup into bowls and top with toasted pine nuts, if desired, and another sprinkle of paprika.

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Spelt farfalle in a creamy butternut squash sauce with roasted broccoli

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I've admired film and photography for most of my life. I've always been particularly responsive to visuals and to sounds. Also to words. I remember my life in little clips and frames. I have an unusual amount of memories from early years... from when I was one or two but they are mostly visuals. I think of them as memory vignettes. They are places that were very comforting to me or of places where I first felt strong emotions.... a favorite carpet or the feel of petting a dog. We lived on the coast in New Bern, NC. Brackish waters are everywhere there, including the pond in our back yard. There was this wooden board walk through this marshy area and tall pines to the dock where my Dad use to set crab traps. I don't really remember the board walk but I remember sitting in the back yard and looking at the thick bed of pine needles and ivy that grew around the start of the boardwalk. In my eye is the coarseness and texture of the wood.

I also remember being taught to shell a crab. Feeling the moist steam of a boiling pot of water and my Dad helping my fingers pop out unwanted parts of a crab. I was confused at the yellow smears of crab gunk on my fingers. I remember my Dad telling me that we needed to get rid of the gunk because it was poisonous... and being afraid that I might accidentally be poisoned by crab in the future. In my nose is the smell of salt and fish. These little frames, moments, memories of experiences are who we are. It is art when I am able to read someone else's experience, and get a frame into their life. It is a point where lives touch in a deep and internal way, a private world. It is why we write, why we take photos, and why we read. The look in a strangers eye from a photograph, or the way colors bounced off each other in a landscape description; they touch me and remind me of my personal vignettes that I guard. I loved this, it was a secret to me. I was consumed in this private life, so much so that I use to be a rather quiet child around strangers. I just absorbed all the visuals without vocalizing much in return. I wanted to be a photojournalist, it is what I started out doing in college for the first few months. I was set on working for national geographic... and who wasn't. Any of us would love that job. At some point I became very hard on myself, I lived in an unrealistic world, or maybe it was the mindsets of other people that made me feel this way. I changed my major, to another design degree, landscape architecture. I had considered it before and it is something creative, involving the environment, helping people, but technical and marketable... it seemed safe.

 

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I practiced photography occasionally, when I was somewhere beautiful and I could actually hold visual vignettes down the road and share them with others. I don't know why I use to give up on things I loved just because they seemed unrealistic. I should have put more confidence in myself and lived with a little less fear. I have a decent camera, I got it for about $400 years ago. It is the nicest camera I have ever owned. Of course there are much, much better cameras. I've never had any formal training in photography or in film, although I have worked heavily with photoshop in college... but mostly because of self education and interest. I've stopped myself from really trying to produce films and better photography and I've made plenty of excused because I am constantly comparing myself to the work of others whom I admire. That is where I have to stop. For me, it is all about the vignettes of memories, stories, and emotion, the things that make you who you are and I want to stop hiding. I'm aware that in comparison to the works of film and photography that are out there, I'm not outstandingly impressive. I'm ok with that, because right now, this is me with my point n' shoot, tripod jerry-rigged onto mason jars, imovie, wrinkled linens, and really delicious food. I'm proud of it, happy about it, and loving to show you and introduce you to the vignettes that make up my life. I hope you enjoy and share some of yours with me. 

 

Watch the video above, The song is Cristobal by the artist Devendra Banhart... one of my favorites.  

This recipe is delicious... I've already made the sauce two weeks in a row, so much beautiful autumn squash. It is definitely inspired by mac n' cheese... just one you can feel much better about eating. Just make sure you get the roasted squash blended into a sauce before eating it all, that stuff is ridiculous, like sweet candy. 

Recipe (Makes 6 - 8 servings)

Butternut squash - 1 large squash, peeled, de-seeded, and chopped into cubes

Yellow onion - 1/2 diced onion

Garlic - 3 cloves

Broccoli - 2 heads of broccoli, chopped of the stalk

Sage - 2TB fresh

Salt/pepper - to taste

Milk (or milk alternative- coconut and unsweet almond both work great!) - 1 Cup

Reserved pasta water - About 1 cup

Spelt flour - 2 cups + extra for dusting

Salt - good pinch

Eggs - 3

Extra Virgin Olive oil - Several TB (4-5 total)

Uncooked pasta - if not making your own pasta or want a vegan alternative

Directions including making your own pasta

Clean a counter top or a large cutting board and spoon your flour into a pile in the center. Sprinkle in some salt and mix together, patting the flour back into a central pile. Make a well in the center of your flour large enough to hold three eggs and a splash of olive oil. Crack in your eggs and then pour in a generous glug of oil.  Use a wooden spoon to gentle stir the eggs, breaking the yolks and slowly incorporating the flour from the sides. Keep going until you whittle away at the sides of the flour, this will take a little while. Once the flour is too sticky for the spoon, flour your hands and gather the dough together, using your hands to incorporate all the rest of the flour. Knead the dough for several minutes, until soft and silky. About 5 minutes kneading.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Let the pasta dough rest on the counter while you chop up all your veggies and garlic. Set the chopped/prepped ingredients aside and pick back up with the pasta.

Take out your pasta dough and cut into 4 pieces. Flour a clean surface and roll out one of the dough pieces very thin... it should be a little translucent. (Of course, if you have a pasta roller, use that) Flipping and rotating the dough as you go, and adding more flour to prevent sticking. Try to roll the dough into a rectangle if you can. Trim the edges of the dough off, so that you end up with a rectangle. I saved the dough trimmings to roll out again in the end. Cut the flat dough, with a sharp knife, into about 1" to 1 1/2" rectangles. Get a little cup of water and place next to your working area. Now, pick up one piece at a time and add a little dab of water to the center and pinch the top and bottom of the rectangle together in the center. Then use your thumbs and index finger to pinch together/flatten out the sides of the dough, it should resemble a bow tie. This process can take a little while, but you will get into a rhythm. Of course, you can just cut the pasta into a different shape, like long linguine noodles, it would be faster. Lay the bow-tie pastas out on a baking sheet to dry a bit until we are ready to cook them. Repeat the process with the other three dough balls and then gather up all your trimmings into a ball and roll those out into bow ties as well. 

Toss the squash cubes in some olive oil and salt/pepper and lay flat on a baking sheet. Roast in the oven for 35-45 minutes, until the cubes are soft, a little browned in spots, and very sweet. Toss the broccoli pieces together in the bowl you used for the squash (no need to wash) with some olive oil and a little salt/pepper. Lay the broccoli out on a separate baking sheet and roast in the oven for about 20-25 minutes until a little brown but still slightly crunchy. It works well to put the broccoli in the oven after the squash has been in there for about 20 minutes... so that they can both come out around the same time.

While those are roasting, bring a medium/large pot of water with a pinch of salt to a boil. Also, heat up a medium skillet with 1 TB of olive oil on the stove. Once the oil is warm add in your garlic, cook for a minute and then add in your onions. Let it soften, stirring occasionally, while the broccoli/squash are roasting. Let the onions cook for at least 10 minutes. Add in your sage to the onions and cook for another minute or two. Remove from the heat and then pour onion mixture into the blender with the roasted squash, set this aside until the pasta is done cooking. 

Once the water is boiling add your pasta, I added the pasta in 3 batches, using a large slotted spoon to remove and drain the pasta. You will want to reserve at least 1 cup of pasta water to thin out the sauce. The pasta takes about 3-5 minuets to cook, or until al dente. Once you remove the pasta, let it drain in a colander and give it a quick rinse with cool water... so it stops cooking. Blend together your squash, onion mixture, 1 cup of milk (or milk alternative), and 1 cup of pasta water. Scrap down the sides, taste the sauce and adjust salt/pepper and add more pasta water if you want the sauce thinner. Depending on how fast you worked, the sauce might need to be re-heated on the stove before adding it to the pasta/broccoli (even though we were very happy eating it straight from the fridge, cold, the next day)  Toss the sauce, broccoli, and pasta together. Enjoy... this stuff is like candy... it is worth it.  

Directions for just the sauce.

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Chop up all your veggies, sage, and garlic. Toss the squash in a bowl with olive oil salt and pepper and then lay the squash out flat on a baking sheet.  The squash will roast for about 35-45 minutes until it is very soft, a little brown in spots, and very sweet. Reuse the same bowl to toss your broccoli together with the olive oil and salt/pepper. Lay the broccoli out on a separate baking sheet. After the squash has been in the oven for about 20 minutes, add the squash in the oven as well... so they can both come out around the same time. The broccoli will roast for about 20-25 minutes, until slightly brown but still a little crunchy.

While the squash/broccoli is roasting, bring a salted pot of water on the stove to a boil, this will be to cook your pasta. Also heat up a medium skillet on medium heat with 1TB of olive oil. Once it is hot, add in your garlic, cook for a minute and then add the in onions. Let the onions soften for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, and then add the chopped sage. Cook for about 2 more minutes and then turn off the heat. Cook your pasta until al dente and then strain out your pasta, reserving at least 1 cup of pasta water, and giving the pasta a quick rinse with cool water. Toss the cooked squash, onion mixture, 1 cup of milk (or milk alternative), and 1 cup of pasta water in a blender and blend until smooth. Scrap down the sides of the blender, taste and adjust salt/pepper, and add more pasta water if you want the sauce thinner, and then blend again. Toss together the cooked pasta, roasted broccoli, and sauce. Enjoy... this stuff is like candy... it's worth saying twice.

 

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Goat cheese & rosemary muffins with a honey drizzle

Fall time. 

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I always have the urge to bake when those leaves start crisping up and the sweaters come out. There is something about the ambiance of being cozied up on the couch with a good book on the weekends and watching the wind blow free yellow tulip poplar leaves as they travel, glide, and then graciously come to rest among their fellow brothers on the earth. After some moments of watching I place my socked feet on the hardwood and wander to the kitchen to poke around at the little bits of this and that. Opening the fridge a few times and checking the inventory of the dry goods cabinet, I allow my mind to stroll into the land of sugar and pastry and to warm sugary breath against cool air. I might stall, place the kettle on to make tea, but by the time the water is hot I already know that I am sucked in and that I am baking. The first time I had a muffin with one of my favorite combinations (goat cheese & rosemary) was at the bakery I use to work here in Charlottesville. It was a fall special we did occasionally. I only had this muffin there once... and I think about it with frequent adoration. The muffin at mudhouse is quite different than this one... at the bakery it was sour cream batter based and the rosemary was infused... giving it a stronger, earthier taste. This one is a recipe to be made on the spot and one that is good for using up any extra yogurt you have on hand. These muffins are mildly sweet and balanced so nicely with the savoriness of the goat cheese and rosemary. You must try it next time the cold brushes your skin.

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Recipe (Makes 12 medium muffins) 

All Purpose Flour - 1 1/2 cups

Spelt or whole grain flour - 1/2 cup

Sugar - 1/2 cup

Butter - 4TB at room temperature

Eggs - 2

Yogurt - 1 1/4cup

Milk - A splash (optional)

Rosemary Powder - 1/2tsp

Fresh Rosemary - 1 TB generous, minced 

Goat cheese - 1/3 cup, crumbled

Honey - 1-2TB

Baking powder - 1 tsp

Baking soda - 1/2 tsp

Salt - 1/2 tsp, scant

Crumble topping

Oats - 1/2 cup, generous

Sugar - 1 TB

Flour - 1 TB

Flaxseed - 1-2TB, ground up

Coconut oil - 2Tb, melted

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Preheat your oven to 375 degrees and butter a muffin pan. Add in your butter and sugar together in a mixer and cream together 5 minutes, scraping halfway through, until light and fluffy. Meanwhile, in a separate bowl, mix together your flours, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and the two different rosemaries. After the butter/sugar is creamed, add in the eggs one at a time while beating on medium low, scraping in between. Then add in your yogurt and stir until combined. Add in the flour and blend on low until just combined, you do not want to over-mix, as it develops the gluten/toughens your pastry. (If your batter seems just a little too thick, add in your splash of milk here and mix together, if not, then omit.) Then add in the goat cheese and drizzle over the honey, stir by hand until distributed... the streaks of honey are ok! 

Place your oats into a blender or food processor and pulse a few times to get a coarse oat flour. Toss these oats with the sugar, ground flaxseed, and flour. Then pour over the melted coconut oil and combine. You should be able to pinch it together into moist crumbles. Distribute the muffin batter evenly into the 12 spaces and then evenly distribute over the topping. Lightly tap the topping into the muffin batter with your fingertips to secure. Bake in the preheated oven for about 25-30 minutes or until completely cooked and slightly golden. 

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Vegetarian take on fish tacos: Cornmeal baked zucchini with purple slaw & adobo cream.

Tacos.

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Right now I'm surrounded by broken bits of twig, twine, and dirt strewn along the floor of my house and nursing hot glue burns. I'm sure my project feels like a cruel temptation to my dogs... as they eye my large stick sign with longing. One night, in the beginning of making the letters out of twigs, Banjo carried off the 'O' and drug its entrails through several rooms. I imagined this inanimate stick object fittingly groaning "oooooo" with agony as it was ripped to shards. I wish I had the sign done, it is oh-so-close, I would show you a picture. It is lovely, considering I needed something cheap out of what I had... which was sticks! Things have been busy lately... and not just because of stick signs. I apologize for absence but believe me, I want to be here with you guys! I'll have more words and photos for you all soon but I needed to make sure you were fed first. Sorry I don't have very many photos... It was too dark for good photos when we had a chance to make dinner, so I took a few of the next day leftovers.

Now, I've mentioned that I believe tacos are the perfect food. I love them that much. I stand by my statement to the end. When things get busy and crazy, tacos slide into the menu often. This recipe, while not strikingly fall, is definitely a recipe you want to fit in before all the zucchinis disappear. You can find baby summer squashes at the farmers market right now since none of those babies will grow very big this late in the season.  Of course, normal sized zucchini can be used if cut down to proper size.

*When things are busy and I don't have time I have no problem buying pre-made tortillas. Sometimes it is fun to make your own though, but a tortilla press is a good investment if you plan on doing this. 

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Recipe (makes a lot of tacos) 

Summer squash - 1lb of baby squash (unusually little ones ya'll), but if using regular cut down to about 2" long sticks. 

Red cabbage - 1 cup generous, slivered

Red onion - 1/4 cup, slivered

Limes - Juice of 2 limes

Cilantro - 4TB, fresh, chopped

Chiles in adobo - 1-2TB of the sauce (depending on how spicy you want it. I went with 2) 

Sour cream - 1/3 cup

Eggs - 2

Coconut oil - 2-3TB (other oil will work as well)

Cornmeal - 3/4 cup

Flour - 1/2 cup (any flour will do)

Bay leave - 1tsp powdered (I threw dried leaves up in a clean coffee grinder to powder)

Ginger - 1/4tsp

Cinnamon - 1/8tsp

Cardamom - few pinches

Paprika - 1/2tsp

Salt/pepper - 1/2tsp

Chop/prep all your veggies. 

Preheat oven up to 350 degrees. And lightly grease a baking sheet with coconut oil

Toss together the cabbage, onion, lime juice, cilantro, and a pinch of salt in a bowl until combined. Set aside until later (this part can even be made a day ahead... tastes better that way!) 

Stir together the sour cream and adobo sauce in a separate small bowl and set aside until the end.

Beat eggs in a small bowl, set aside, and then combine the cornmeal, flour, and spices in a medium bowl. Now, one at a time, take a zucchini (or zucchini piece) and dip it into the eggs, turn to coat, and then drop it into the cornmeal mixture, turn to coat, and then lay it on the baking sheet. Repeat with the rest of the zucchinis. 

Bake the zucchini for 10 minutes. Take out the pan and flip the zucchinis while brushing on a little more coconut oil. Bake for 10 more minutes. 

Serve a zucchini or two on a tortilla (tortilla recipe below), top with slaw, and then drizzle with the adobo sauce. Enjoy this delicious piece of veggie heaven.

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Corn/flour hybrid tortilla recipe (Makes 12-16)

Masa Harina - 1 cup (found in the international section of grocery or carniceria) 

All purpose flour - 1 cup

Warm water - 3/4 cup, generous

Olive oil - 1-2Tb ( A hefty glug)

Salt - a pinch

Wax paper and a tortilla press. 

Mix together the masa, flour, and salt. Make a well in the center and pour in the water and olive oil. Stir together with a wooden spoon, slowly incorporating the sides until you form a ball. Then use your hands to get in there and knead until the ball comes together and there are no dry spots left. You don't want it sticky though... it needs more flour in that case. Add a splash more water if you think it is too dry. Make a thick disc with the dough and cut it into 12 wedges ( I cut mine into 16 wedges... but that makes really small tortillas). Roll each wedge into a ball, set aside. Cut off 6 strips of wax paper, big enough to cover the base of your tortilla press and place a skillet on high heat. Here comes the juggling part.

Place a piece of wax paper on the bottom of the press, top it with one ball of dough in the center, and then top it with another piece of wax paper. Press down the tortilla press all the way and then lift up. Peel off the tortilla and then lay it onto the skillet (once hot). After a minuet, flip the tortilla. It should be slightly speckled with brown. Let the tortilla cook another minuet on the other side, if it starts to balloon up, remove from heat and its done! Repeat the process with the other wedges using both sides of the wax paper only once.

 

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Leek, squash blossom, & corn chowder for the harvest moon.

Silver lady. 

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The moon is mysterious, wise, and beautiful as women themselves. I think all women have a little bit of the moon inside us. Illuminating the world at night, watching the earth at sleep. At some point all of us have been stopped dead in our tracks because of a gorgeous moon. We should do that every time. Early this morning was a most beautiful harvest moon or the corn moon. Where I am located, the moon wrapped herself up in an orb of soft, warm orange. I stood outside with Ty, my bare-feet in the cool dirt and hands cupped around a small bowl of corn chowder.

This moon was particularly important to Native Americans and its light told them that crops such as corn, squash, beans, and wild rice were ready for harvest. The moon was so bright that it invited them to work late into the night harvesting plants in lady moon's bright glow. They worshiped their light-bringers, and we should be thankful for them as well. Almost all cultures/religions (Ancient Egyptians, to Chinese, to Druids, to Ancient Greeks, Early European, to North and South Americans, to Christianity) were heavily drenched in moon lore. All religions are still colored with the moon today, even if we do not realize it. One of the most carving experiences of my life was exploring the Mayan culture on a four day hike to Machu Picchu, where, among other things, I saw the Inca temple of the moon. During the hike, our guide taught us to pour out a little food from everything we ate to give it to Mama Pacha (mother world). It only makes sense to give a little back the the earth that gives us so much. I left my little bowl of chowder out on a stump under the glow of the harvest moon and mama pacha. 

This corn chowder is perfect as we approach the end of summer and welcome fall.

"On a gold throne, whose radiating brightness
  Dazzles the eyes--enhaloing the scene,
Sits a fair form, arrayed in snowy whiteness.
  She is Chang-o, the beauteous Fairy Queen.
Rainbow-winged angels softly hover o'er her,
  Forming a canopy above the throne;
A host of fairy beings stand before her,
  Each robed in light, and girt with meteor zone.'"

                                                  -Mr. G. C. Stent idea of the Chinese versifier translated

 

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Recipe (Serves about 8 bowls, freezes well too)

 

Corn- 6 ears, shucked and kernels cut off cobb (keep cobbs)  

Leeks - 3, washed and sliced into thin slivers

Red onion - 1/4 an onion, diced

Sweet peppers - 3 small, or 1 small bell pepper, chopped

Squash blossoms - 3-4 (chopped + extra for garnish) (optional) Make sure to remove the stamen (central stalk of the bloom)

Red skinned potato - 1 medium, diced

Spinach - 2 large handfuls, fresh, finely chopped

Garlic - 3 cloves, minced

Mushroom broth - 6.5 cups (or veggie broth but I think mushroom is better) 

Olive oil - 2TB

Butter - 2TB

Flour - 1.5TB

Light cream - 1 cup

Mild cheddar - scant 1/2 cup, grated.

Salt/ pepper - to taste, about a teaspoon but I was generous with the pepper

Bay leaves - 3

Dry sage - 1TB

Thyme - 2tsp

Chives - a few TB for garnish (optional) 

Chop all veggies and have them ready. Place the 2TB of olive oil in a large stock pot on medium heat, add garlic, leeks and onions. Let them sweat and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add in the sweet peppers, squash blossoms, sage, and thyme. Cook for another 2 minutes. Add in the broth, the potato, bay leaves, and corn cobs (with the kernels cut off). Let it simmer for 20 minutes. Add in 1/4 of the corn kernels. Let it simmer for another 10 minutes. Remove and discard the bay leaves and corn cobs.

Pour the mixture into a blender and blend until smooth. Have a ladle, a whisk, and the blender full of soup handy. Return the empty pot to medium heat on the stove and add in the 2TB of butter, you are going to make a roux. Once the butter melts whisk in the flour and then, while whisking, ladle in the soup slowly. Continue doing this, whisking in-between ladle fulls until it is all incorporated. The soup will be a little thicker now. You are almost there! Keep the soup on medium heat and add then place another 1/4 of the corn kernels into the blender with the cream. Blend until smooth. Add the cream mixture into the soup and then all the rest of the reserved corn kernels and fresh spinach. Let it heat up at least another 10 minutes (not boil). Add your cheese and let it melt. Season it with salt and pepper, and serve warm topped with chives and squash blossoms. 

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Figgy baked oatmeal with peaches, anise, poppy seeds, & flax.

Peachy.

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My Dad called me peachy as a child, it was his favorite nick name. Occasionally he will still call me peachy, especially if I am doing something a little childish. The other night I called my Dad and felt like I was making the phone call under peachy's alias. I was calling about my foot. A minor injury I've had in my foot for a good portion of the summer finally screamed "I've had enough" and burst into flames across my metatarsal and toes. My foot is so sensitive, swollen, and inflamed it makes it very difficult to walk, stand, or bend. I've been trying to hit it hard with some anti-inflammatory herbs and rest but it was so painful that night I called my Dad. I needed to tap into his bit of medical knowledge. I was ranting about my unrealistic concerns and spouting that my foot needed amputation or that I had a flesh-eating bacteria in my pain-induced delusion. I wanted him to say that it was ok to go to the ER but, in reality, I needed someone to talk peachy out of going to the ER... which my Dad did of course. I came back to myself, calmed down, took some medicine, complained to Ty, and went to sleep... the next day I still had my foot. Thanks for Dads and for nicknames like peachy. Thanks for peachy and figgy baked oatmeal. I'm still unable to stand/walk very much so I haven't been able to do much cooking but I made this baked oatmeal this morning and my foot is glad that I did. 

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Recipe (Serves 4 large portions or 6 small - also keeps in the fridge well) 

Figs - 2 cups, fresh, cut into a mix of quarters/halves

Peaches - 2 fresh, pitted, pealed, and sliced

Oatmeal - 2 cups rolled oats 

Flax seed - 1/4 cup, ground in a processor or coffee grinder

Almonds - 1/2 cup slivered almonds

Poppy seeds - 2-3TB

Anise extract - 1/2 tsp

Vanilla extract - 1 tsp

Cinnamon stick - 1 stick (or 1tsp ground) 

Nutmeg - 1/4tsp

Sugar - 1-2TB

Butter - 4TB (2TB of it melted)

Egg - 1

Milk or milk alternative - 2 cups

Honey - 1/8 cup

Preheat oven to 375 degrees and use 1/2 a TB of butter to butter a casserole dish capable of holding at least 6 cups. Melt 1.5TB of butter over medium heat in a large skillet. Once the butter is melted add in figs and peaches, caramelize for 6-8 minutes. Pour in the anise extract, stir, and turn off the heat.  Pour the fruit into the bottom of the buttered casserole dish. If using, break the cinnamon stick in half and tuck into the fruit. (If you are using the ground cinnamon save it to add in with the dried ingredients.) Toss together the oats, almonds, poppy seeds, ground flax, sugar, and nutmeg (and ground cinnamon, is using). Distribute the oat mixture over the fruit evenly. Whisk together the milk, egg, honey, melted butter, and vanilla extract together. Pour the milk mixture over the  oats/fruit evenly, trying to moisten all the oats. Place in the oven an bake for 40-45 minutes or until the oats are set and it is slightly golden. Serve warm and drizzled with a little extra melted butter, honey, or milk if desired. 

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Summer squash & tomato cobbler + cornmeal drop biscuits.

Days of fireflies, berries, porch swings, and tomatoes.

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The other day I was on a the phone with a friend and telling her about how I missed things about the southeast and I was thinking that it probably sounded crazy. I mean I already miss Colorado, I loved every moment with the Rockies, aspen forests, and elk grazing just a short drive away. Not to mention the last camping/hiking trip we took. I was overwhelmed with the possibilities and accessibility out there. I certainly find a lot of fault in the majority of politics and beliefs that radiate from the southeast but I still found myself missing it. Some friends out in Denver explained that they felt claustrophobic when on the east coast because while driving down the road there were trees on either side of the road. Out there the roads are wide open, flat land seamlessly ending into the silhouette of the Rockies. It is surreal, but it isn't home to me. I feel a little sad that the east coast and especially, the southeast, doesn't get enough glory in the natural beauty department when compared to the west. They both deserve admiration in different ways.

The southeast with its sandy beaches, rolling dunes, coasts flecked with small islands and pockets of wild horses, marshy swamps of prehistoric palms, carnivorous plants, and mangroves. There are places deep in the coastal forest filled with the chorus of insects and birds growing so loud at dusk that your imagination is transported to an exotic jungle. Regions of rivers, streams, and lakes form such intricate watershed systems and secret swimming holes bursting with fish, crawdads, alligators, and sea monsters. Bogs and wetlands create undisturbed homes for boar, wild dogs, mosquitos swarms, and secluded humans who, in a way, are inhabiting a frontier too difficult to conquer. Ancient live oaks so gnarled and twisted and drenched in spanish moss, they produce a pattern of sunlight across the surface of the earth that slightly morphs and sways in the wind, like a kaleidoscope. There is evidence left of early Native Americans, their blood flows in most Easterners veins, and the sacred sites they left behind; jewelry, earth mounds, burial sites, arrowheads, shell rings, pottery, tears, stories, and mysteries. A patchwork of plains and farmland with seams of pillowy tree canopy embroidered with cows, horses, sheep, hogs, goats, wildflowers, and bunnies. The farmhouses and barns are so cozy and eternal, even the uninhabitable ones look like a home from a dream. Even the worst of suburbs are engraved with the footprints of deer herds, fox, raccoon, old growth trees, and early american ruins.

The Appalachians are clothed in a happy thicket of trees with too many species to count, some of the most bio-diverse forests in the country. The Appalachian mountains are ancient, among the oldest on earth, being near them makes you feel more wise, makes you explore your own self. Hidden doorways open up from mountain faces and reveal limestone caverns so dark, cold, and deep that even the fish are blind. The caves harbor bats and other creatures of darkness, allowing the mind to run with stories of the imagination. They hide the secrets of Native Americans, war, prisoner escapes, and Tom Sawyer. Giant boulders seem to have both fallen from the clouds and poked up from the punctured crust of the earth, they form homes for curious black bears and their smaller friends. Hidden gorges and rock cities remain barely explored, with steep walls cradling pockets of teal water, fossils, and multicolored salamanders. The lands flecked with the ruins of our ancestors; stone mills, abandoned buildings, graveyards, canals, camps, forts, damns, waterwheels, cobblestone streets, some so overgrown that they are, in their own way, an undiscovered Appalachian Angkor Wat. Thunderstorms instantly turn the empty air into a forest with flashes of light illuminating raindrop trees and cracks of thunder shaking the ground, shaking your home, shaking you to the soul. Soils diverse and fertile produce the much loved okra, peaches, strawberries, blueberries, pecans, tomatoes, and walnuts, and children with berry stained fingertips and jars filled with fireflies.

I could go on. We haven't discussed the architecture, sounds of rain on tin roof, creaking porches, and blue ceilings. The history of our country both good and bad, where the United States first set its roots. Or the dialect, language, culture, religion; a diverse people made up of unique groups such as Lowcountry, Immigrants, Native American, Gullah, Cajun, Creole, snake handlers, and others. I haven't mentioned the food, the gatherings, biscuits, catfish, fried green tomatoes, collards, hoppin' john, pound cakes, cobbler, grits, barbecue, dumplings, gravy, cornbread, gumbo, fried okra, cast iron skillets, and sweet tea. I could write an equally admiring bit about the west, hell, about Colorado alone, but it would be missing a certain amount of history, mystery, and controversy. I can get caught up in my frustration over certain things about the southeast (in history and in modern day) that annoy me, that disappoint and dishearten me. I forget about all the magic and wild that exists in our natural world here, in our history here. It is amazing and inspiring and I wish these things could be figureheads for the southeast rather than politics. I wish a lot of things. I think that if the land could speak, it would wish these things too.

In honor of the beautiful things in our world, in our country, and yes in the southeast, here is a take on southern food from an untraditional southerner. 

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Recipe (one big ole casserole - I used about a 12" oval dish) 

Cherry tomatoes - 16ounces, whole

Summer squash - 2 small/medium (I used one zucchini and one yellow squash) , cut into slivered rounds

Yellow onion - 1 medium, cut into slivers

Corn - 1 ear, fresh, kernels cut off the cob. 

Olive oil - 5TB

Dry sherry or basalmic vinegar - 2TB

Garlic - 4 cloves, 2 smashed and 2 minced.

Fresh thyme - 2TB (scant)  with the leaves pulled off from the stalk.

Salt/pepper - to taste, fresh cracked pepper works well here

All purpose flour - 1 3/4 cup

Cornmeal - 2/3 cup

Heavy cream - 1 cup

Cold butter - 3/4 a stick

Sugar - large pinch

Preheat your oven up to 450 degrees and cut up all your veggies. Toss the tomatoes (whole), squash, and corn together with 3TB of olive oil, 1TB fresh thyme, smashed garlic, and salt/pepper. Pour into your casserole dish and place into the oven when it is ready and roast for 20 minutes, stirring after 10 minutes. Meanwhile put the last 2TB of olive oil in a large skillet on medium heat. Add in the garlic and slivered onions to the skillet and caramelize for 20 minutes, while the veggies are roasting in the oven. After 20 minutes, take out the veggies in the oven and add in the caramelized onions and 2TB of sherry, toss together and return to the oven for 10 more minutes.

While the veggies are roasting, mix together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, pinch of salt, 1TB fresh thyme, and a good amount of black pepper. Cut the cold butter into pea sized pieces and toss into the flour mixture. Add in the cream and stir into a dough. Add in a little extra cream if needed... you want the dough to be somewhat dry but stick together nicely. Store the dough in the refrigerator until it is ready to use. 

After the veggies have roasted for 10 more minutes (a total of 30) take out the dish, stir, and top it with big spoonfuls of the dough. Return to the oven for 14-15 minutes or until the biscuits are cooked and slightly golden. Top with cracked pepper and serve warm. 

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Summer pizzas. A basil + pumpkin seed pesto with cherry tomatoes & a baba ganoush inspired pizza with sweet pepers & arugula

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So much has happened in the last few weeks that it is hard to know where to begin. In short, I was living in Denver, CO, spent a week wandering the desert, drove across the country, and now I'm back living on the east coast in Charlottesville, VA where my current surroundings resemble a rainforest. Things have been dramatically nomadic and I've been absent from this space for too long. Perhaps I am still not ready to explain everything, well, at least my emotions of coming back to the east coast, my mind is still deciding how I feel about it. I can however provide you with some delicious pizza recipes I have been sitting on for a few weeks (sitting on the recipe that is... sitting on pizza for that long would be, erm, um, gross). I figure you need to make these before all our beloved summer veggies disappear. The first pizza, the basil pesto one, was inspired by happyolks, she is a love and so are her recipes. I made my own version of it recalling the beautiful photos in her post. The second was concocted from a desire to use some garden eggplants and my love for baba ganoush (a spread related to hummus but with eggplant instead of chickpeas). The eggplant pizza is amazing, my definite favorite of the two, but... why do you have to pick when you can make both?

I do want to share with you the experience of camping in the desert for a week. The harshness and beauties of the desert are so extreme that I barely feel as if it happened. While you are there, the intensity of emotion and feeling is so strong, that when you look around and there is no one else in sight for miles, you kind of have to question if it is reality.

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The first day was spent driving through western Colorado and pretty much, all of Utah. Utah is a drastically changing landscape. It is as if Utah decided to mimic a rubrics cube throwing on various faces of mountain, desert, farmland, and forests as easily as shifting squares of color. We ended our tour de Utah when we reached Zion National Park, but since we arrived so late in the day all the walk-in tent sites were full. In the state of Utah you can camp anywhere on public land for free and we cozied up on some BLM land near Zion. The skies were beautiful and streaked with meteors during the peak of Perseid meteor shower. Out there the skies are so huge, it appears as if the meteors last longer, their tails slowly fading out instead of quick flicks across the sky. The next day we hiked around Zion and up several miles into the canyon carved out by the Virgin River. Wading up the shaded canyon in the cool waters felt like paradise contrasting against the heat of the desert sun soaked into our skin. I couldn't help but think of pottery while rubbing my hand across the sandstone walls, layers of minerals deposited in a most unique glaze. The Virgin River: master sculptor. 

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WIld buffalo grazing, painted skies, and lush aspen forests were in our future at the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. Did you know the north rim is heavily forested? You could be lost in there for days never guessing you were in Arizona. The Grand Canyon is unbelievable... read it the way some people pronounce it with emphasis... un-be-liev-a-ble. It really is. Standing there the canyon does not only smack you with beauty but with questions of history and expanse of time. I couldn't help but envision the landscape as relatively flat with the snake of blue Colorado River flowing through it and then watch it carve and chip away the layers of earth into the vision I was seeing before me. The temperature was a pleasant 77 degrees and dipped down to 40 during the night as we slept huddled under the branches of aspen and pine, watching shadowy figures of deer grazing nearby through the window of the tent. 

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While driving to Glen Canyon we got sent on a very long, unexpected detour through Arizona. We will call it 'taking the scenic route.' When we reached Glen Canyon we grabbed a forest road map and picked a road the headed towards the water. The road was an unpaved dirt road that criss-crossed over several dry washes and through mini-canyons and opened up to a sandy bank. As the only ones out there; we spilled out of the car and headed straight for the water where we spent the rest of the afternoon. The sky faded into brilliant color over the lake, reflecting a perfect image of the horizon's beauty right back up to the sky as if she were admiring herself in the mirror. We decided to camp out there since we found campfire rings left behind from previous folk. We wished for no rain for the road getting back would be flooded and we'd be stuck until it dried out, and fortunately, luck was on our side. All night long I heard the excited yipping, yapping, and howling of coyotes hunting for rabbits and birds. They get especially loud after making a kill. I've camped and lived around coyotes, hearing them in the night is not a new thing for me, but I've never heard them that closely before or ever that many. I never get tired of listening to them, they are beautiful. 

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I had visions of popping a car tire on the treacherous roads we drove out on the next day, I worried we would be stuck in the desert waiting for someone to come along and rescue us. We would have to drink the melted ice water in our cooler to stay alive and when that ran out I'd be searching for yucca root and we would be half-dead when someone found us. Dramatic? Yes, but that is what my mind does. It took us 4.5 hours to go 40 miles on this dirt road until we finally reached the highway. In the beginning we drove up sandstone mountains to the top of the plateau, the view was phenomenal and terrifying. We realized it was too late to turn around and we were on this road for the long haul, avoiding loose boulders and sharp rocks. The arid landscape stretched on forever and I became very familiar with the twisted and gnarled trunks of juniper and the skeletons of creeks that resurrect during rain. We spent the day and night at Capitol Reef National Park. This place is so appropriately named, I felt like I was walking through a coral reef of red sandstone flecked with lush green plant life exploding from the river, just like tropical fish pop with colors against the unending blue of the sea. Early mormon settlers came to this place and planted acres of orchards, irrigating them with runnels from the river. It seemed surreal, a weird sort of oasis wandering under the dappled shade of apple, pear, apricot, cherry, and peach trees with the views of dry sandstone desert moving into view at the end of the rows. There is so much life and hidden history of the desert.  Despite how harsh the desert is, it can be so life-bringing, so colorful. The bands and palette of reds, browns, and orange that streak through rock faces in layers. The brilliant papery blooms of flowers, the deep greens of foliage and cactus. The grays and whites of dried juniper trunks. Huge flows of green that kiss alongside the rivers, cutting the red landscape into two pieces. Pristine teals of river water paved in every imaginable color with stones sanded into smooth rounds. The skies at all times of the day; the morning with their soft glows of color, mid-day it is an idealistic sky with blues so bright and clouds billowing as if it was ripped from a storybook page, and the sunsets are vibrant bands of color growing more intense until the sun blinks out and the milky-way emerges with not a single artificial light to compete with it.

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I'm continually amazed at the early Pueblo people and other Native American tribes in the four corners, how brilliant and intuitive these people were/are. At the end of our trip we got to spend time at Mesa Verde, I long to be able to live like that. I'm devastated that those civilizations ended and mystified as to why. I'm even more devastated at the ending of later Native American civilizations, and ashamed as to why that happened as someone who comes from both European and Native American descent (like many of us do). The four corners region, culture and landscape is perhaps, one of the oldest regions in the country, the most amazing, and it still feels like a secret.

 

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Recipe (Makes two pizzas)

Pumpkin seed oil. Ok ya'll, you really should get some of this stuff. Not only does it have amazing benefits, especially good for vegetarians as an omega source, but it tastes awesome. It has a deeper, almost smokier flavor, obviously very reminiscent of pumpkin seeds. I get mine from here Mountain Rose Herbs and theirs is cold pressed, organic, and unrefined. In this pesto recipe you can of course substitute the pumpkin seed oil for olive oil, but if you get around too it, try the pumpkin seed!

Quick Dough (For 2 crusts)

All purpose flour - 4 cups
Ground flaxseed - small handful of ground flaxseed (optional)
Flaxseed - A tablespoon or two of whole seeds for look/texture (optional) 
Salt - 1tsp
Active dry yeast - 3TB
Warm water - generous 1 1/2 Cups between 110 degrees and 115 degrees
Sugar - 1TB
Olive oil - 4TB
 
Place warm water, sugar, and yeast in a bowl and whisk until dissolved. Set it aside for 5-10 minutes until it begins to foam. Meanwhile mix together the flour, flaxseed, and salt. Then add the olive oil into the water/yeast mixture. Make a well in the flour and pour in the water/yeast/oil mixture. Slowly stir together until moist and knead until slightly tacky but not sticky. Adjusting with a little flour or water as needed. Knead with your hands on a floured surface for about 5-10 minutes. Place the ball of dough back into an oiled bowl, cover with a cloth and let sit in a warm place for about 2 hours or until doubled. Meanwhile prepare the pizza toppings. After two hours, turn the dough out, divide it in two. Also, a recommendation is to make the eggplant pizza first, since the eggplant needs to cook first.
 
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Baba Ganoush, sweet pepper, and arugula salad pizza.

Eggplant - 1 small/medium eggplant. 

Lemon juice - 2 lemons

Tahini - 3TB

Olive oil - about 1/4 cup plus extra for drizzling

Salt/pepper - to taste

Sweet peppers - 6-8 sweet peppers chopped into slivers

Fresh cilantro - small handfull

Fresh arugula - 3-4 handfuls

Feta - 4TB (optional) 

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Place the whole eggplant in the oven on a baking sheet on the top rack and place another baking sheet filled with hot water on the bottom rack. Bake the eggplant for 30-40 minuets. Meanwhile chop up your sweet peppers into slivers. Remove the eggplant and let it cool until you can handle it. After you take the eggplant out, reset the oven temperature to 500 degrees. Once you can handle the eggplant, peel the skin off and discard the skin except for a few, small pieces. Add in the eggplant and few skin pieces into a food processor or blender along with juice of 1.5 lemons, tahini, and salt. Drizzle in olive oil while blending and stop when it has reached a consistency similar to hummus. 

Roll out your pizza dough on a flourd surface and transfer to a baking sheet. Spread over the eggplant spread (baba ganoush), top with the slivers of sweet peppers, then sprinkle over feta (omit for vegan), and then sprinkle over cilantro. Rub the crust edges with olive oil and then bake in the oven for 10-15 minutes or until golden. Meanwhile massage the fresh arugula in a bowl with the rest of the lemon juice, a drizzle of olive oil, and a sprinkle of salt/pepper. Once the pizza comes out of the oven top it with the fresh arugula. All ready to be eaten!

 
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Summer pesto and tomato pizza

Fresh basil - I packed a 5ounce salad green container with basil from my garden and used that much. So about 5oz weighed.

Arugula - I had a few, large, spicy arugula leaves in my garden so I threw those in. About 1 small handful. (optional)

Garlic - 4 cloves, chopped

Pine nuts - 1/3 cup

Pumpkin seed oil - 1/4 cup plus a little extra for drizzling

Salt/pepper to taste - go light on the salt since you are adding cheese to the pizza, which is salty

Cherry tomatoes - 2cups, generous, sliced in half. Feel free to use more or less.. I just purchased so many. 

Fresh mozzarella - 8ounces or to preference.  

Fresh pepper - cracked over top.

Preheat your oven to 500. Throw the basil, arugula, garlic, pine nuts, and pumpkin seed oil in a food processor or blender. Blend until smooth. Drizzling in a little extra oil as needed. Taste and adjust for salt/pepper. Set the pesto aside and slice your tomatoes. Roll out your pizza dough on a floured surface, I rolled mine out to fit a baking sheet since I did not have my pizza stones in Denver. Transfer your dough to the baking sheet. Spread over the pesto, I was generous with the amount but I had pesto left over. Spread the cherry tomatoes halves evenly and then tops with tears of mozzarella. Rub the crust edges with a little olive oil (optional). Bake in the oven 10-15 minutes until the pizza is golden brown. Crack over some black pepper and enjoy! 

 

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